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1984-1985 Catalogue 



The Swain School of Design is a four-year professional college 
of art and design offering the Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree 
in graphic design, painting, printmaking and sculpture. 




Swain School of Design Catalogue 




Table of Contents 

4 General Information 

4 Introduction 

6 Location and Facilities 



8 


The Curriculum 


8 


Foundation Program 


10 


Major Program 


12 


Graphic Design Major 


16 


Painting Major 


20 


Printmaking Major 


24 


Sculpture Major 


28 


Liberal Arts 


30 


Policies and Procedures 


30 


Admission 


33 


Fees and Financial Aid 


34 


Student Services and Student Life 


36 


Academic Policies and Procedures 


40 


Course Descriptions 


40 


Foundation: Freshman Year 


40 


Foundation: Sophomore Year 


41 


Major Studies 


42 


Studio Electives 


42 


Liberal Arts Electives 


46 


Faculty, Administration, Trustees 


48 


Maps 




The Swain School of Design reserves the right to 
change, at any time and without prior notice, its 
course offerings, fees, calendar, rules, regulations 
or procedures stated in this catalogue or 
elsewhere. 

Non-Descrimination Policies In accordance with 
the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Title IX of the 
Educational Amendments of 1972, the Swain 
School of Design admits students of any race, 
color, age, sex or national and ethnic origin to 
all the rights, priviliges, programs and activities 
generally accorded or made available to students 
at the School. It does not discriminate on the 
basis of race, handicap, age, sex, color or 
national and ethnic origin in the administration 
of its employment policies, educational policies, 
admissions policies, scholarship and loan 
programs, or other school-administered 
programs. Inquiries regarding compliance with 
the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Title IX may 
be directed to the Dean of the Swain School of 
Design, or the Director of the Office of Civil 
Rights, Department of Education, Washington, 
D. C. 

Credits 

Edited by: Peter Newport and A. D. Tinkham 

Design: Thomas Corey, Henry Berthiaume, 

A.D. Tinkham 

Photography: Catherine McGuiness, Esther 

Solondz, Sarah Benham, Emmy Gear-Ortiz and 

Nicole St. Pierre 

Printing and typesetting: Reynolds-DeWalt 

Typing: Diane Cambra, Ginny Sexton 

Cover: Marc Surprenant 



4 General Information 



The purpose of the Swain School of Design is to educate men 
and women to become professional artists and designers. The 
school offers a specialized program of studies intended to 
foster the student's individual growth through the close 
attention of the faculty. This education aims to develop in the 
student the ability to produce works of art and design that are 
thoughtful contributions to the culture as a whole. 




Introduction 5 



Because of its small size, Swain is an 
intimate college whose course of 
instruction depends on an intense and 
continuing relationship between students 
and faculty. 

Society needs visually intelligent people 
to make its art and to design its artifacts 
and communications. A dissonant 
environment needs artists and designers 
to imagine how it can be made whole and 
hospitable, and to work to make it so. 
Artists and designers need a broad 
understanding of history and culture to do 
that work well. For that reason, students 
at Swain study art history, literature and 
social science as well as those specific 
disciplines that lead directly to their 
professional goals. 

We expect our graduates to be prepared 
to enter the professional fields for which 
they have studied, either through 
undertaking further studies at the 
graduate level, or by entering their 
individual fields directly. 

Graduate Profile During 1981 we made 
a survey of what our most recent 
graduating class was doing, and were able 
to make the following profile for the class 
of 1980. Out of a class of thirty-two, eight 
were attending graduate schools at 
institutions including Cranbrook Academy 
of Art, Queens College of the City 
University of New York, Pratt Institute, 
Parsons School of Design, and the Rhode 
Island School of Design. Eleven of the 
graduates were working in their 
professional fields, two were teaching, 
and one was traveling in South America. 
Three were working at home, one found 
employment in an area not directly 
related to the arts. The remaining six 
could not be reached for comment. 

History The Swain School of Design 
was established in 1881 as a free school, 
bearing the name and good wishes of the 
New Bedford philanthropist, William 
Swain. When the textile industry came to 
dominate the city, the Swain School began 
to concentrate on instruction in design. 
Gradually, the school developed programs 



in painting, sculpture, printmaking and 
graphic design. Within the last fifteen 
years, Swain has tripled its enrollment, 
added six buildings to the campus, 
established a department of liberal arts, 
and achieved accreditation as a Division I 
member of the National Association of 
Schools of Art and Design. 

Swain has become distinguised for 
disciplined vitality both in its program of 
basic studies and in its advanced studio 
areas. 

Accreditation and Affiliations Swain is 
fully accredited as a Division I member of 
the National Association of Schools of 
Art and Design. 

The college is accepted by the Veterans 
Administration for the education of 
veterans and authorized by the United 
States Department of Justice to enroll 
non-immigrant alien students. 

The Swain School of Design is a fully 
participating member of the Southeastern 
Association for Cooperation in Higher 
Education in Massachusetts (sachem), a 
consortium of nine area colleges. Through 
SACHEM, Swain students may enroll in 
selected courses at other member 
institutions at no extra cost. 

Other groups or associations with which 
the college is affiliated include: 

The College Art Association 

The American Federation of Art 

The Council for the Advancement and 
Support of Education 

The Art Librarians Society of North 
America 

The New England Association of College 
Admissions Counselors 

The New England Association of College 
Registrars and Admissions Officers 

National Association for Student 
Financial Assistance 




"My hope is that the 
provision made herein will 
be sufficient for 
establishing and supporting 
a school of high character, 
where the pupils may 
receive a thorough 
education based upon the 
most liberal and 
enlightened principles." 
From the will of William 
W Swain, September 21, 
1858 



6 General Information 



The William Crapo Gallery 
was built in 1925 to 
provide a space for regular 
exhibitions as an 
enrichment to the Swain 
community. 




Location and Facilities The Swain 
School of Design is set in the city of New 
Bedford, Massachusetts, in one of the 
city's historic residential districts and 
within walking distance of both the 
downtown area and the waterfront. The 
five-acre campus includes nine buildings 
which house ample, well-equipped 
studios, including individual studio spaces 
for juniors and seniors. As a professional 
college of art and design, Swain is almost 
unique for its location in a small city with 
ready access to major metropolitan 
centers. 

The Rodman building is one of the city's 
many notable nineteenth-century 
mansions. It houses the President's office, 
the Graphic Design Department, the 
cafeteria and other classroom space. 



Designed by William Russell, it is 
considered one of the best examples of 
Greek revival architecture still existing in 
New Bedford. 

The Crapo building contains four large 
studios with north light where students 
can work in close proximity to the Crapo 
Gallery, built in 1925 as an exhibition 
space for the school. 

In addition to group shows or exhibitions 
of faculty or student work, the gallery has 
shown the work of such artists as: 

Joseph Albers Richard Hunt 

James J. Audubon Lester Johnson 
Harry Callahan Tomoko Miho 



Freidel Dzubas 
Frederick Frieseke 
David Hockney 
Jim Hodgson 



Robert Rauschenberg 
Robert Reed 
Maraja Villila 
Massimo Vignelli 



The Whaling Museum, not 
far from the Swain campus, 
represents a part of the 
rich cultural heritage of 
New Bedford. 



Location and Facilities 7 



The Library is housed in the Melville 
Building, which was the home of Herman 
Melville's sister. It offers a collection of 
about 16,000 books on the visual arts and 
other fields. The resources of the library 
also include 26,000 slides of works of art 
and design. 

Sections of the collection support the 
literature and humanities programs of the 
college. Through sachem consortium, 
students at Swain have full privileges at 
the libraries of Southeastern 
Massachusetts University and other 
consortium members. 

Also included on the main campus at 
County and Hawthorn Streets are the 
Rodman Annex and the Currier Building, 
which contains additional studio space. 



A few blocks away is Swain's newest 
acquisition, the Elm Street building. A 
large open space of 12,000 square feet, 
the Elm Street facility houses studio and 
shop space for both the sculpture and 
printmaking departments. The print- 
making facility includes studios for 
individual students and a pressroom 
equipped for intaglio, lithography, 
silkscreen and relief printing. The 
sculpture facility includes studio and shop 
space in which students may work in 
wood, metals, clay, fabric, plaster, stone 
and concrete. 



The front door of the 
Crapo Building leads to the 
Crapo Gallery, a facility 
available to the Swain 
community and the public 
alike. 




8 The Curriculum 




Sculpture exhibit 



The Foundation Program uses a carefully devised curriculum to 
acquaint students, through their own work, with the variety 
and precision of visual experience. 

Foundation Program: Sophomore Year 

The sophomore year continues and 
intensifies the aims of the Freshman year. 
Sophomores choose two trial majors, in 
order to explore the fields in which they 
might wish to concentrate their studies 
during their junior and senior years. In 
addition, students choose among studio 
elective courses which tend to emphasize 
specific technical skills. Some examples 
include Basic Photography, Materials and 
Techniques in Contemporary Sculpture, 
and Production and Processes, for graphic 
design. 

All sophomores take two semesters of 
printmaking and generally carry one 
liberal arts elective each semester. 

Trial Majors In each semester of the 
sophomore year students select trial 
majors in at least two of the three 
following areas: graphic design, painting 
or sculpture. This allows the student to 
obtain enough first-hand experience in 
the major fields of study offered by the 
college to choose a major wisely at the 
end of the sophomore year. 

Sophomore Review During Sophomore 
Reviews, which occur at the end of the 
year, students present themselves as 
candidates for acceptance into one of the 
major programs of the college. Before the 
review, each sophomore presents to the 
Dean's office, a written statement 
indicating the choice of a major field and 
the reasons for that choice. 

The work presented at the review should 
include examples done for all the studio 
courses taken, but should emphasize work 
done in the field of intended 
concentration. The review gives the 
student and the faculty an opportunity to 
assess the student's overall performance 
in the foundation program and to discuss 
the student's individual needs and goals. 



Foundation Program: Freshman Year 

The Foundation Program has been 
designed to develop in each student the 
skills and understandings which are basic 
to further study in the visual arts. The 
program seeks to develop the following 
abilities: 

— to analyze and solve problems in two- 
and three-dimensional design. 

— to understand the principal theories of 
color and composition, their historical 
foundations and their relationship to 
human physiology and psychology. 

— to translate volumes, rhythms and 
structural relationships to a two- 
dimensional surface, the page. 

— to use reading and writing as a means 
to find information, develop ideas and to 
communicate one's own convictions. 

— to understand that civilization is an 
evolving process in which clear relation- 
ships exist between the arts and man's 
other accomplishments. 

In order to meet its goals, the Foundation 
Program is structured around six-hour 
studio classes which generally meet once a 
week. During the course of the day, each 
student receives the individual attention 
of the instructor. 



Foundation Program 9 




Following a successful review, the student 
is accepted, by faculty action, into one of 
the major programs of study. 

Credits per Semester 



Freshman Courses 


1st 


2nd 


Freshman Drawing 


3 


3 


Drawing 121, 122 






Introduction to Three-dimensional 






Design 


3 


3 


Sculpture 151, 152 






Introduction to Two-dimensional 






Design 


3 


3 


Design 111, 112 






Freshman English 


3 


3 


Humanities 100, 105 






Readings in Western Civilization 


3 




Humanities 110 







Individual course descriptions begin on 
page 40. 



Introduction to Art History 
Visual Studies 100 

Total freshman program 



Sophomore Courses 

Introduction to Printmaking 
Printmaking 241, 242 

Trial Major 

Trial Major 

Studio Elective 

Liberal Arts Elective 

Total sophomore program 



15 15 



1st 


2nd 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


15 


15 




Visiting Artists 

The programs of the college 
have been richly supplemented 
through the presentations of 
visiting artists, designers and 
lecturers, including the 
following: 

Rosemary Beck, Painter 

Ed Benguiat, Typeface Designer 

Kenneth Baker, Critic 

Carl Belz, Curator 

Ivan Chermayeff, Graphic 

Designer 

Seymour Chwast, Illustrator 

Muriel Cooper, Graphic 

Designer 

Stavros Cosmopulos, Art 

Director 

Robert DeNiro, Painter 

Richard Fishman, Sculptor 

Malcolm Grear, Graphic 

Designer 

Mary Gregory, Furniture 

Designer 

Arthur Hoener, Painter 

Helene Herzbrun, Painter 

Richard Hunt, Sculptor 

Lester Johnson, Painter 

Art Kane, Photographer 

Dick Lyons, Graphic Designer 

John McConnell, Graphic 

Designer 

John Matt, Sculptor 

Elise Meyer, Gallery Director 

Tom Ockerse, Graphic Designer 

Davis Pratt, Curator 

Chris Pullman, Graphic 

Designer 

Robert Reed, Printmaker 

John Udvardy, Photographer 

Dietmar Winkler, Graphic 

Designer 

Carl Zahn, Graphic Designer 

Two lecture programs, the 
GRAPHIC DESIGN FORUM and 
the fine ARTS forum, were 
supported in 1980-81 by 
grants from the NATIONAL 

ENDOWMENT FOR THE 

ARTS and the polaroid 
corporation, respectively. 



10 



The Curriculum 



Swain offers photography 
courses that are open to all 
students. Although the 
college does not offer a 
major program in the field, 
students in the graphic 
design department study 
photography as an integral 
part of their curriculum. 



Major Program Third-and fourth-year 
students concentrate in a single major 
field: graphic design, painting, print- 
making or sculpture. This concentration 
allows students to find a sense of depth 
and discipline in a professional field. 
We expect students in the major 
programs: 

— to maintain a sense of direction in their 
work. 

— to speak and think clearly about the 
intentions of their work and the problems 
involved with producing it. 

— to apply the same critical standards to 
their own work and to the work of others. 

— to function as independent professional 
artists or designers capable of organizing 
both their work and their time. 

In order to make the major program more 
specific to individual needs, students in 
the junior and senior years may choose to 
satisfy three of the nine semester credits 
in the major studio through work with 
another instructor. The following options 
are available in any semester: 

Independent Study Independent study 
is an option whereby, in extraordinary 
circumstances, a student may design an 



individual course of study. A course 
proposal must be submitted which 
includes a prospectus of the work to be 
done, a schedule for the review and 
criticism of that work, and a description 
of the conceptual basis of the course 
which shows that the knowledge and/or 
skills gained could not be gained through 
the regular program. The course must be 
approved by the students major advisor, 
the Dean, and the Academic Affairs 
Committee. 

— the Studio Seminar. Students may 
request permission of their major advisor 
to apply Studio Seminar credits to their 
major studio requirements. This option 
also requires the approval of the Dean. 
Descriptions of studio seminars begin on 
page 42. 

Third- and fourth-year students continue 
to take elective courses in the liberal arts 
and studio areas. Complete descriptions of 
elective courses begin on page 42. 
Descriptions of the requirements for the 
Bachelor of Fine Arts degree begin on 
page 36. Individual departmental pre- 
requisites for graduation are noted in the 
appropriate sections below. 




Major Program 1 1 



Junior Year In the semester following a 
successful sophomore review, the student 
begins work in a field of major study. 
Ample studio space near appropriate 
shop equipment allows students to work 
closely with faculty and exchange ideas 
with other students. 

Junior Review The Junior review 
customarily occurs in the spring of the 
third year and affords the student an 
opportunity to evaluate with faculty, the 
student's progress in the major field. Two 
weeks before the Junior Review, the 
student is required to deliver a written 
statement to the major instructor about 
the work accomplished, formal problems 
encountered and intentions within the 
major area. With the approval of the 
major instructor, the paper is forwarded 
to the Dean's office. 

Senior Year In the senior year, students 
are advised to carry only 12 credits each 
semester. The reduced course load of the 
senior year reflects the conviction that 
students have achieved a level of concen- 
tration in their major fields that requires 
them to have access to large amounts of 
time that are not structured by the 
college. 

Unimpeded access to individual studio 
and equipment areas becomes the means 
through which the student may develop 
the discipline that is invaluable in later 
professional life. 

Senior review In the middle of the 
senior year, the work of each student is 
again reviewed by the faculty. A week 
before the date of this review, seniors are 
required to deliver a written statement 
about their work to the Dean's office. The 
Senior Review allows fourth-year students 
to demonstrate to the faculty the direction 
their work has taken and the degree of 
mastery attained in their major fields. 
The faculty must act to approve the 
Senior Review before a student may 
receive credit for work done in the major 
studio course, or receive the degree. 



Senior Exhibition In order to graduate, 
each senior must submit acceptable work 
for inclusion in the Senior Exhibition. 
The public, formal presentation of this 
body of work is regarded as the culmina- 
tion of the academic program. 



Junior Courses 



Credits per Semester 
1st 2nd 



Major Studio 9 

Three major studio credits may be satisfied 
by Independent Study or Studio Seminars as 
described above. 
Studio Elective 

Liberal Arts Electives 

Total junior program 



Senior Courses 

Major Studio 
Three major studio credits may be satisfied 
by Independent Study or Studio Seminar as 
described above. 

Liberal Arts Elective 



3 


3 


6 


6 


18 


18 


1st 


2nd 


9 


9 



Most studio courses run the 
full day, punctuated only by 
two short breaks and lunch. 
Standing and drawing is 
Benjamin Martinez, 
Assistant Professor of 



Total senior program 



12 12 Painting. 







Silk screen cleaning in the 
Printmaking department. 



12 The Curriculum 



Graphic design is the process of identifying problems in visual 
communication and solving them. While designers apply their 
skills to such varied projects as the design of an exhibition, a 
corporate identity program, highway signage, a poster, or a 
book, the method remains the same. It is first to research, to 
ascertain what is needed, and then to produce a solution that is 
both aesthetically and functionally effective. 



The Rodman Building 
provides classroom and 
studio space for the graphic 
design department. 
Designers have access to 
their own studio spaces at 
all hours during the 
school year. 



Mat hew Perry 




Graphic Design Major 13 



During the trial major in the sophomore 
year, students are exposed to the 
vocabulary that comprises the language of 
graphic design: typography, photography, 
illustration, color, and composition. The 
junior year, the first year of the major 
studio in graphic design, builds on the 
work of the trial major, but the problems 
become progressively more complex. The 
senior year is considered to be the first 
year of the student's design career during 
which the senior assembles an individual 
portfolio of work through the completion 
of a variety of problems presented by 
instructors. 



Students majoring in graphic design 
participate in numerous seminars with 
designers from outside the college. In 
their junior or senior year, students are 
placed for apprenticeships with 
professional graphic design offices. 

While some students graduating from the 
graphic design department proceed 
immediately to graduate study, most go 
directly to work as professional designers. 




Design studio 



Matt Castigliago 



14 The Curriculum 



Graphic Design Major — A Sample 
Curriculum 

Freshman and Sophomore Years 

Students who are considering a major in 
graphic design must have satisfied the 
requirements of the Foundation Program 
which are described beginning on page 8. 
A sample curriculum for the remainder of 
the degree program follows. 



Junior and Senior Years Following a 
successful Sophomore Review, the 
student is accepted, by faculty action, into 
the Graphic Design major and undertakes 
the following course of study during the 
junior and senior years. A full description 
of the major program can be found 
beginning on page 10. 




Design department crit. 



Graphic Design Major 15 



Sophomore Courses 



Credits per Semester 
1st 2nd 



Trial Major in Graphic Design 3 

Design 211, 212 

Introduction to Photography 3 

Design 213 

Production and Processes 
Design 200 

Additional sophomore requirements are 9 
described on page 9- 

Total sophomore program 15 



3 



Junior Courses 



1st 

9 



Major Studio in Graphic Design 
Design 321, 322 

Three credits of this requirement may be 
satisfied by either a Independent Study or a 
Studio Seminar. Descriptions of these 
courses begin on page 10. 

Additional junior requirements 

Total junior program 

Senior Courses 

Major Studio in Graphic Design 9 

Design 421, 422 

Three credits of this requirement may be 
satisfied by either a Independent Study or a 
Studio Seminar. 

Remaining senior requirements 3 

Total senior program 13 

Total requirements for the Bachelor of 
Fine Arts degree in Graphic Design 



15 

2nd 

9 



9 


9 


18 


18 


1st 


2nd 



3 
12 

120 




A graphic designer 
develops an understanding 
of process. 



16 The Curriculum 



Using the language of two-dimensional expression, painting 
tries to wrest understanding from the flow of experience. 
Georges Braque spoke about painting this way: "by (painting) 
an apple next to an orange they cease to be an apple or an 
orange and become fruit." The painting becomes greater than 
the sum of its parts. 



The student majoring in painting builds 
on the abstract theories introduced in 
freshman two-dimensional design and the 
formal and observational skills 



emphasized in drawing classes as well as 
the sophomore Trial major in Painting. 
In the junior year, emphasis is placed on 
unifying observational skills with 




Students majoring in 
painting have their own 
studio space in which they 
can store all of their work 
together, work on it for an 
extended period, paint in 
its midst, and have the 
instructor criticize it as a 
body of work. 



Peter Dickinson 



Painting Major 17 



consideration of form, color and 
composition. Students work in their own 
studio spaces on campus to facilitate 
continuing communication about works in 
progress both with the instructor and 
with other students. Principal studio 
spaces for painting majors are located in 
the Currier Building, although some 
studio space is located in the Crapo 
building to take advantage of the 
generous north light which that building 
provides. Both the gallery and the library 
are central to the painting department 
studios. 



In the painting major, students work with 
increased independence as they move 
toward the end of the senior year and, by 
the time of graduation, they are expected 
to assemble a coherent body of work 
which demonstrates significant commit- 
ment to a number of clearly specified 
problems and concerns. 

Students also participate in group 
critiques, attend technical demonstrations 
as well as formal and informal seminars 
concerning traditional and contemporary 
art theory. 




During the junior and 
senior years, the instructor 
encourages students to 
work more and more 
independently, to define 
more clearly the direction 
of their painting and to 
defend its validity. 

Painting by Paul Menard 



18 The Curriculum 



Painting Major — A Sample Curriculum 

Freshman and Sophomore Years All 

students who are considering a major in 
painting must have satisfied the require- 
ments of the Foundation Program which 
are described beginning on page 8. A 
sample curriculum for the remainder of 
the degree program follows below. 

Sophomore Year Sophomores may 
formulate their programs to include the 
requirements for the Bachelor of Fine 
Arts degree in Painting. 

Junior and Senior Years Following a 
successful Sophomore Review, the 
student is accepted, by faculty action, into 
the Painting Major and undertakes the 
following course of study during the 
junior and senior years. A full description 
of the major program can be found 
beginning on page 10. 



Sophomore Courses 



Credits per Semester 
1st 2nd 



3 



Trial Major in Painting 

Painting 231, 232 

Life Drawing I 3 

Drawing 221 

Figure Modeling 
Sculpture 222 

Additional sophomore requirements are 9 
described on page 8. 

Total sophomore program 15 



3 







J, 



Painting Major 19 



Credits per Semester 


Junior Courses 1st 


2nd 


Major Studio in Painting 9 


9 


Painting 331, 332 




Three credits of this requirement may be 




satisfied by either a Independent Study or a 




Studio Seminar. Descriptions of these 




courses begin on page 10. 




Life Drawing II 3 




Drawing 321 




Additional junior requirements 6 


9 


Total junior program 18 


18 



Sophomore Courses 



Credits per Semester 
1st 2nd 



Major Studio in Painting 9 

Painting 431, 432 

Three credits of this requirement may be 
satisfied by either a Independent Study or a 
Studio Seminar. 

Remaining senior requirements 3 

Total senior program 12 

Total requirements for the bachelor of 
Fine arts degree in Painting 



3 
12 

120 




20 The Curriculum 



Printmaking is a means of expression that allows investigation 
into the explicit relationship of image and craft. In addition 
to being an art in its own right, printmaking has drawn the 
attention of painters, designers and sculptors, since it offers the 
means to produce a single visual thought in multi-original 
form. 




In the middle of the year, 
seniors have reviews in 
which their work is shown 
to the faculty. At the 
reviews, students discuss 
their goals, direction and 
progress. They demonstrate 
to the faculty the extent of 
their mastery of their work. 



Lithograph, top by Karen 
Michels 
Silkscreen by Susan 
Thompson 

Lithograph on right by 
Bruce Tubman 



Printmaking Major 21 



The printmaking facility at the Elm 
Street Building provides 4,000 square feet 
for junior and senior students. The space 
includes a general studio containing 
equipment for lithography, intaglio, silk- 
screen and relief printing; a group 
critique area, and individual work spaces 
for juniors and seniors. 



In addition to expanding their proficiency 
in basic printmaking methods, juniors in 
printmaking study increasingly sophisti- 
cated techniques. As the year progresses, 
students should develop the ability to 
justify the relationship of medium to 
content. 




Collage by Bruce Tubman 



Hand made paper by 
John Race 



22 The Curriculum 




Virtually unlimited access to these 
facilities allows major students to develop 
an independent approach to their work 
and to explore and master the techniques 
needed for their expresssion as artists. 
Careful faculty guidance helps students to 
speak and think critically about their 
work in the context of contemporary art 
and to see its place in the continuum of 
art history. 



Printmaking Major — A Sample 
Curriculum 

Freshman and Sophomore Years All 

students who are considering a major in 
printmaking must have satisfied the 
requirements of the Foundation Program 
which are described beginning on page 8. 
A sample curriculum for the remainder of 
the degree program follows below. 

Junior and Senior Years Following a 
successful Sophomore Review, the 
student is accepted, by faculty action, into 
the Printmaking Major and undertakes 
the following course of study during the 
junior and senior years. A full description 
of the major program can be found 
beginning on page 10. 



Printmaking Major 23 




"Through his hands man 
establishes contact with the 
austerity of thought. They 
quarry its rough mass. 
Upon it they impose form." 
H. Focillon 



Sophomore Courses 

Introduction to Printmaking 

Printmaking 241, 242 

Additional sophomore requirements are 12 
described beginning on page 8. 

Total sophomore program 15 15 

Junior Courses 1st 2nd 

Major Studio in Printmaking 9 9 

Printmaking 341, 342 
Three credits of this requirement may be 
satisfied by either a Independent Study or 
a Studio Seminar. Descriptions of these 
courses begin on page 10. 

Remaining distribution requirements 

Total junior program 

Senior Courses 

Major Studio in Printmaking 9 9 

Printmaking 441, 442 
Three credits of this requirement may be 
satisfied by either a Independent Study or 
a Studio Seminar. 

Remaining senior requirements 3 3 

Total senior program 12 12 

Total requirements for the Bachelor of 

Fine Arts degree in Printmaking 120 



9 


9 


18 


18 


1st 


2nd 



Sylvie Call 




24 The Curriculum 



By projecting visual concepts into three-dimensional space, 
sculpture creates objects that compete for attention with all the 
other objects in the three-dimensional world. It asks to be 
measured against one's experience of things as they are and 
poses questions of how things might be. Sculpture doesn't 
mean something, it is something. 




The great amount of time 
allotted to studio classes in 
the junior and senior years 
allows students to consider 
more ambitious series or 
larger works. During these 
years, sculpture students 
should be forming a 
commitment and a sense of 
discipline as they 
concentrate more deeply 
upon those sculptural 
problems and materials 
which they find most 
compelling. 



Sculpture Major 25 



Initially students are encouraged to exper- 
iment with a wide range of materials and 
ideas, allowing them to find a unity be- 
tween concepts and the materials which 
best express their sculptural concerns. 

Working closely with their instructors, 
students develop progressively greater 
insight into concepts guiding their work 
and attain mastery over necessary 
materials and techniques. 

The facilities of the sculpture studio 
include over 5,000 square feet of studio 
and shop space in the Elm Street 
Building. High ceilings, lifting equipment 



and industrial grade power tools allow 
students to produce large-scale work. A 
partial equipment inventory includes an 
overhead crane, several welders, a 10' 
metal brake, band saws for metal and 
wood, a 10" table saw, a radial arm saw, a 
commercial sewing machine, a bench 
grinder, and various other hand and 
power tools. 

Graduating seniors are expected to have a 
broad understanding of contemporary and 
earlier sculpture and to have attained a 
general competence in important 
sculptural techniques. 




26 The Curriculum 




Sculpture students and 
faculty use the campus 
grounds to site their larger 
outdoor pieces. 



Sculpture Major 

A Sample Curriculum 

Freshman and Sophomore Years All 

students who are considering a major in 
sculpture must have satisfied the 
requirements of the Foundation Program 
which are described beginning on page 8. 
A sample curriculum for the remainder of 
the degree program is shown here. 

Junior and Senior Years Following a 
successful Sophomore Review, the 
student is accepted, by faculty action, into 
the Sculpture Major and undertakes the 
following course of study during the 
junior and senior years. A full description 
of the major program can be found 
beginning on page 10. 



Sculpture Major 27 




Sophomore Courses 

Trial Major in Sculpture 
Sculpture 251, 252 

Materials and techniques in 
Contemporary Sculpture 
Sculpture 200 

Additional sophomore requirements are 
described on page 8. 

Total sophomore program 

Junior Courses 

Major Studio in Sculpture 
Sculpture 351, 352 
Three credits of this requirement may be 
satisfied by either Independent Study or 
a Studio Seminar. Descriptions of these 
courses begin on page 42. 

Remaining junior requirements 

Total junior program 



1st 2nd 



Senior Courses 



Credits per Semester 
1st 2nd 



9 
18 



9 
18 



Major Studio in Sculpture 
Sculpture 451, 452 
Three credits of this requirement may be 
satisfied by either Independent Study or 
a Studio Seminar. 

Remaining senior requirements 

Total senior program 

Total requirements for the Bachelor of 
Fine Arts degree in sculpture 



3 

12 



3 
12 

120 



28 The Curriculum 



Liberal Arts Good visual work does what good writing does: it 
makes experience more vivid. A place or an idea is ignored, 
invisible, until it has been painted, or used in a story, or 
mapped, or gardened or in some other way imagined. The 
deepest craft of any artist is that of falling in love with the 
world, of knowing that something which has been seen is 
worth seeing. 



Cartoon by Scott Nash 




Liberal Arts 29 



Courses in the liberal arts take the work 
of art historians, poets, travelers, 
novelists, historians, sociologists, 
anthropologists, pyschologists, 
philosophers and present them in a form 
designers and artists can respond to and 
use productively. 

During the four-year course of study, 
students take twelve courses in the liberal 
arts: four in visual studies, six in the 
humanities and two in social or natural 



sciences. Required courses, Freshman 
English, Readings in Western Civilization 
and An Introduction to Art History, are 
taken in the freshman year. The rest are 
elective courses which are described 
beginning on page 42. 



About one third of the 
credits required for the 
degree are taken in the 
liberal arts. 




30 Policies and Procedures 



Diane Cambra, the 
Registrar. 




Ginny Sexton, Assistant to 
the Admissions Director 



Your application for admission may be regarded as a dialogue 
between you and this college, during which both of us learn 
more about the other. You take the responsibility for providing 
information about yourself in support of your application. We 
take the responsibility to insure that you have every 
opportunity to form a frank and complete understanding of 
the Swain School of Design; its programs, its environment and 
its potential value to you as a visual artist. 

your educational goals as we have come to 
understand them through the admissions 
process; through our evaluation of each other. 
Ideally, the decision will be one on which we can 
both agree, since we will have reached it 
together. 

Freshman Admission 

A high school diploma or successful completion 
of General Educational Development 
examination (GED) is required for admission to 
Swain. 

Students applying directly from high school are 
generally considered only for fall admission, 
although the Admissions Committee may 
provide for spring semester admission. 

There is no deadline for application, although 
early application is recommended. The 
Admissions Committee meets often to review 
completed applications. Notification of 
committee action are sent out by the Admission 
Office twice each month during the academic 
year. After June first, applications are processed 
on a continuing basis until all positions in the 
entering class are filled. 

Applicants should note that the most critical 
deadlines are those for financial aid. Applications 
for some state programs, for example, should be 
filed by early February. 

The following steps are required for admission 
to the college: 

1. Complete the Application for Admission found 
in this catalogue. If the application is missing, 
write or call the Secretary of Admissions to 
request the necessary materials. 

Send the completed application and application 

fee of $25.00, payable to the Swain School of 

Design, to: Mr. A. D. Tinkham 

Admissions Director 

Swain School of Design 

19 Hawthorn Street 

New Bedford, Massachusetts 02740. 



Your application is evaluated by the faculty 
Admissions Committee in consultation with the 
Admissions Director. We consider your academic 
record, interview reports, letters of recommen- 
dation and your portfolio. 

The work presented in your portfolio is 
considered in the light of your individual 
background and is the single most important 
factor influencing our decision. Talent is 
impossible to judge absolutely. Some successful 
candidates have had little or no previous 
experience and others have had extensive 
backgrounds. In any case, strong personal 
motivation is essential. 

Your grades are of interest to us since they are 
an indication of where you have placed your 
priorities as well as a record of how well you 
have done in school. Letters of recommendation 
and conversations with your art teachers and 
guidance counsellors may also help us to 
evaluate your application. 

You can best measure our ability to meet your 
expectations by visiting the campus and talking 
with students and faculty about Swain. We will 
try to keep you informed of on-campus activities 
that may be of interest to you. In addition, we 
will also notify you of opportunities to meet in 
your area with representatives of the college. 

When we reach a decision on your application, it 
will reflect an assessment of our ability to meet 



Admission 31 



Should the application fee represent an unusual 
financial hardship, the Admissions Director may 
waive the fee on the written request of a parent, • 
art teacher, &e guidance counsellor., or sotld! .<M 

2. Arrange for your school to send an official copy 
of your transcript to Swain. Unofficial, or student 
copies, of transcripts are not suitable for 
admission purposes. 

3. Request letters of recommendation from people 
who know either you or your work well. 

Recommendations from art teachers and 
guidance counsellors are certainly appropriate, 
but letters describing your interests and achieve- 
ments outside the visual arts are frequently very 
useful, also. 

4. Assemble a portfolio of your work to present as 
part of your application. JYpur portfolio gives us 
a clear indication of how you may benefit from 
professional training in the visual arts. We look 
for signs of accuracy and independence in the 
way you see, and evidence of your ability to 
develop visual ideas. 

Your portfolio should include what you feel to 
be your best and most representative work. The 
pieces you choose as well as the manner in 
which they are presented is largely for you to 
decide. We have seen work presented for every 
imaginable subject, including portraits, still-life 
studies, abstract designs, interiors, exteriors, 
light plugs, juke boxes, dogs, sewing machines, 
figures in space suits, figures posing, boyfriends, 
girlfriends, plans for underwater cities, package 
designs for trick dice, stage sets, musical 
instruments, pots and ceramic candies. Work in 
any medium is acceptable but we have found 
that drawings in black and white from life 
represent your ability best. Please do not present 
work copied from photographs. 

Your portfolio should consist of eight to fifteen 
pieces of original work. Slides are an acceptable 
alternative in instances in which great 
inconvenience will result if original work is 
submitted J jjjrv ^ fU/k^a 

5. Arrange a Portfolio Interview with a 
representative of the Admissions Committee. 
This occasion gives you and the interviewer a 
chance to talk about your expectations and those 
of the college as well as an opportunity to 
present your portfolio for evaluation. 

We prefer to interview candidates on the Swain 
campus. However, if the demands of time or 
distance present difficulty, the Secretary of 
Admissions can make special arrangements in 
individual cases. 

Additional Admissions Recommendations 

In addition to the steps required for admission 
listed above, applicants may wish to consider the 
following recommendations: 



1. We recommend that applicants take the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) sometime before 
the end of their academic senior year. Although 
it is not required for admission, it provides us 
with an additional means to evaluate your 
academic ability. 

2. For many students Swain is either their first 
or single choice college. If you are sure this is 
true in your case, please request Early Decision 
Plan information from the Secretary of 
Admissions. 

3. We recommend that all applicants complete 
the financial aid section of the Application for 
Admission bound in this catalogue. The 
Admissions Office will routinely send all 
financial aid applicants detailed descriptions of 
programs available and precise instructions to 
follow to complete the financial aid application 
process. 

4. Writing, like drawing, is another way to 
record the world around you. If you wish to send 
us a sample of your written work it may help us 
to get to know you better. 

The Swain School of Design supports the efforts 
of secondary school officials and governing 
bodies to have their schools achieve regional 
accredited status to provide reasonable assurance 
of the quality of educational preparation of its 
applicants for admissions. 

Transfer Admission 

Swain encourages students with previous college 
experience to apply for admission at an 
advanced level. Policies which pertain to the 
admission of transfer students and to the award 
of credits in transfer may be found beginning on 
page 38. 

The Admissions Committee will consider 
transfer applications for either fall or spring 
semester admission. Applicants will insure the 
best possible selection of elective courses by 
completing the application process no later than 
April first for fall semester admission and no 
later than November first for spring semester 
admission. 

To apply as a transfer student you must meet all 
application requirements specified for freshman, 
as stated above, in addition to the following: 

1. Provide a list of courses in which you are 
currently enrolled, if applicable. 

2. Include in your portfolio recent work which 
represents the field in which you intend to 
study. 

3. Have transcripts sent to Swain from all 
colleges attended. 



32 Policies and Procedures 



Commitment Deposit 

Once you have been accepted, you must pay a 
$50.00 commitment deposit within two weeks of 
your notification of admission. 

If you have been offered admission and wish to 
defer your enrollment you may do so by 
notifying the Admissions Director of your 
decision. Commitment deposits that have been 
applied to tuition charges will remain in force if 
your notification is received before the fifteenth 
of the month preceding that for which 
admission was offered. Admission may be 
deferred for a maximum of one year. 

Special Students 

Any individual may be admitted into credit 
courses of the college as a Special Student, under 
the following conditions: 

1. A Special Student is admitted to a course by 
consent of the instructor. 

2. The applicant must have earned a high school 
diploma or its equivalent; or be judged, by the 
course instructor, to be of comparable age and 
maturity. 

3. Specific prerequisites must have been met to 
the satisfaction of the course instructor. 

4. Space in the course must be confirmed to be 
available by the Registrar after regular students 
have registered. 

Individuals applying under this classification do 
not pay the usual application fee, but do pay the 
normal registration deposit and tuition charges 
as listed on page 33. 




Nickie Pelczar, Financial 
Aid Officer. 



Course credits accrued as a special student may 
be counted towards the requirements for the 
Bachelor of Fine Arts degree if a special student 
is subsequently admitted into the degree 
program. 

Courses Not for Credit 

Individuals meeting the requirements of Special 
students may take courses not for credit. In this 
case, tuition charges are equal to one-half of the 
usual fee for the course. 

Fees and Financial Aid 

Financial Aid The financial aid program of the 
Swain School of Design is intended to enable 
students to meet the costs of attending the 
college. 

Federal financial aid guidelines state that the 
primary responsibility for meeting the expenses 
of higher education lies with the student and/or 
the student's family. The amount a family can 
reasonably expect to contribute to cover 
educational costs, as detailed above, is 
established through a need analysis based on the 
information supplied by the student and the 
student's family on the Financial Aid Form 
(FAF). 

The extent to which estimated costs exceed the 
funds available to the student is defined as 
demonstrated need. It is this amount that the 
college tries to match through various financial 
aid sources. Financial aid to students at Swain is 
provided in three basic forms: 

1. Grants are given without requiring the 
student to work or repay the money. The 
following kinds of grants are available: 

a. Pell Grants, (formerly, Basic Grant) provided 
by the federal government. Students not eligible 
for Pell Grants may be eligible for other 
federally funded aid administered through the 
college. 

b. Supplemental Educational Opportunity 
Grants are also funded by the federal 
government, but are administered by the college. 

c. Swain School of Design Scholarships for full- 
time students only. 

d. State scholarships, provided by Massachusetts, 
Rhode Island, and many other states to residents 
of the respective state. 

e. Other scholarship and grant programs 
provided by independent agencies. 

2. Employment opportunities are provided 
during the school year and in the summer 
through the College Work-Study Program. 



Financial Aid 33 



3. Loan programs which permit students to 
borrow funds at favorable rates of interest 
include the National Direct Student Loan (ndsl) 
and the Guaranteed Student Loan (GSL). 

Tuition Fees The 1983-84 fee for regular full- 
time study (12 credits or more) is $2,150. per 
semester. For less than a full-time course of 
study program, the fee is $190. per credit. 

The college offers a $50. reduction in tuition for 
students who pay fall semester tuition before 
May 1. or spring semester tuition before 
September 1. For further information about 
these optional programs please contact the 
Admissions Office. Tuition fees are payable 
upon registration for each semester. Financial 
aid awards, if applicable, are credited towards 
tuition obligations as funds are received by the 
comptroller. Late registration may result in an 
additional $50. charge; please see page 36. 

Two optional programs are available to help 
families and students meet educational expenses. 
Although the details vary, each program allows 
the payment of school costs on a monthly basis. 
These are as follows: 

The Deferred Payment Program is a loan plan 
which advances money to the parent to pay for 
college costs. This program provides for 
monthly payments and make available a wide 
variety of payment terms. 

The Monthly Budget Program offers parents a 
method of budgeting educational expenses 
without going into debt. This program is not a 
loan, tuition is prepaid in advance of each school 
term. 

Additional information may be obtained by 
writing to: 

Tuition Plan 

Concord, NH 03301 
or by calling toll free 1-800-258-3640. 

Other fees and deposits which are described 
elsewhere in this catalogue are listed below. 
Application Fee $25.00 

Commitment Deposit $50.00 see page 32 

Studio Deposit $10.00 see page 10 

Transcript Fee $ 2.00 see page 39 

Other policies concerning payment of fees may 
be found on page 36. 

Refund of Tuition Fees Students withdrawing 
from the college within the first two weeks of 
school receive a refund of 75% of the tuition fee 
and forfeit the commitment deposit. After the 
first two weeks of school, no refund of the 
tuition fee is available. Please see page 36 for 
withdrawal procedures. 



Cost of Education We estimate the total cost of 
education at the Swain School of Design for the 
1983-84 academic year as follows: 

Resident Commuter* 

Tuition 1983-84 $4300 $4300 

Books and Supplies 500 500 

Room and Board 1875 1100 

Transportation 225 930 

Personal Expenses 500 500 



$7400 



$7330 



transportation expenses based on 60 mile 
round trip. 

How to Apply for Financial Aid The Swain 
School of Design strongly urges all applicants 
and prospective applicants for admission to 
apply for financial aid by completing either or 
both of the preliminary steps below: 

1. Complete the Financial Aid section of the 
application for admission found in this cata- 
logue. If the application is missing, write or call 
the Secretary of Admissions to request this 
application material. 

2. Complete the Financial Aid Form (FAF) from 
the state in which you are now a resident and 
submit it to the College Scholarship Service soon 
after January 1 of the year in which you are 
planning to attend college. For example, if you 
intend to attend college during the 1983-84 
school year, you should file your FAF soon after 
January 1, 1983. Our school code is 3803. 

1. Do not assume that you are eligible for 
financial aid. 

2. Be sure to observe deadlines. Deadlines for 
some state programs are as early as February. 

3. Take advantage of our experience with 
financial aid. Personnel in both the Admissions 
and Financial Aid Offices are able to answer 
your questions. 







' i u '"i 








i m * jj 








jf M -«J 




- 


E "* ^W Jp' 


•-jkfJ.V j. 






1 - IUk 


m ~ 


V, 




•_-^^B 


^ : ' ; "- N>: - ; .^H 





Diane Conlon, receptionist 



34 Policies and Procedures 



Student Services and Student Life 



The Student Government 
plans a number of parties 
and other events during the 
year. To the right, open 
house at the Elm Street 
Studios. 



A significant part of the 
Swain social life involves 
gallery openings, small 
concerts, and talks by 
visiting artists. 




Housing Swain maintains a housing 
service which receives information 
about rooms and apartments available 
to incoming students in the community. 
Referrals are made on the basis of the 
student's response to a questionnaire 
sent out by the admissions office to 
determine financial considerations and 
the type of accommodations desired. 

Housing expenses are estimated on 
page 33. Further questions may be 
directed to the Admissions Director. 

Medical Care We advise all students to 
participate in the student Blue Cross/Blue 
Shield Master medical group coverage 
available through the college. Specific 
information on this program is available 
through the Admissions office. 

All students are covered for accidents 
which may occur in the course of 
activities sponsored or supervised by the 
college. Maximum coverage is $1000: a 
$25 deductible is borne by the student. 

A medical doctor is available to consult 



Student Services and Student Life 35 



with any student. Arrangements may be 
made through the Dean's office, but the 
costs of consultation are borne by the 
student. However, such costs may be 
covered under the Blue Cross/Blue Shield 
program mentioned above. 

Faculty Advisors A member of the 
faculty is appointed by the Dean to serve 
as an advisor to each student. This 
appointment is made in the fall, and both 
student and faculty advisor are informed 
of the appointment at the time of 
registration. 

The advisor's role is to be available to 
discuss academic or other matters with 
the student, as well as to take some 
concern for the student's general well- 
being. Faculty advisors are automatically 
given copies of letters from the Dean's 
office relating to academic matters. 

Both student and advisor should feel free 
to initiate discussion when appropriate. 

Student Services Student Services sees 
its primary role as actively supporting 
and helping students achieve their 
educational objectives while they are in 
residence at Swain and as they begin their 
careers once they have graduated. 

In addition to short term counselling and 
referral, Student Services provides 
information and programs in areas such 
as housing, legal services, fuel assistance, 
tutoring, money management and aid, 
advocacy and health. Career development 
workshops are also held as preparation 
for resume writing, job interviews, and 
eventual career placement for graduates. 
The Student Services Office, located in 
the Rodman building also serves as the 
office of the Student Council. The Student 
Services Director works closely with the 
Council in coordinating all student 
activities throughout the college. 

Additional Services The college main- 
tains a cafeteria in the Rodman Building. 
A book and supply store carries most of 
the materials students need for classes. 
Through the bookstore, the college 
assembles a freshman kit for incoming 
students so books and hard-to-find 
materials are available as needed during 



the freshman year. Costs for the kit vary 
from year to year, and are borne by the 
student. Specific information is available 
through the office of the Admissions 
Director. 

Student Participation in Institutional 
Governance The Student Council with 
members chosen by the student body is 
responsible for student governance, and 
participation on all school committees. In 
addition, representatives of the Student 
Council from each class are invited to 
attend the monthly faculty meetings. 

Students take an active part in the faculty 
committee work of the college. They are 
represented on the Academic Affairs 
Committee, and the Gallery Committee 
and help to monitor the academic 
program of the college and schedule 
gallery presentations. 

The Student Affairs Committee evaluates, 
discusses and makes recommendations to 
the faculty or administration in matters 
regarding student life. This committee is 
made up of five students, three faculty 
members, the Financial Aid Director and 
the Student Services Director. This 
committee is the central forum for issues 
that pertain to student affairs. 

Student insights are also considered 
through representation on the Board of 
Trustees which concerns itself with the 
long-term development of the college. 

Extracurricular Activities The Student 
Council plans extracurricular activities 
according to the interests of the student 
body. Each year Swain sponsors a number 
of bus trips to museums and galleries in 
New York and Boston as well as cultural 
and social events within the college. 

Student Conduct Students and faculty 
at Swain are committed to their work to 
an extent that makes problems of 
personal conduct rare. However, a serious 
breach of reasonable standards of conduct 
will be regarded as the grounds for 
disciplinary action which may include 
suspension from the school. 




The cafeteria and student 
lounge are located in the 
Rodman Building, and 
serve as a meeting place for 
students and faculty during 
lunch and between classes, 
as well as an exhibition 
space for student work. 



36 Policies and Procedures 



Academic Policies and Procedures 

1. Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Fine 
Arts. To qualify for the degree of Bachelor of 
Fine Arts from the Swain School of Design, a 
student must meet the following requirements: 

A. A total of 120 credits in the following 
distribution: 

18 freshman foundation studios 

6 in An Introduction to Printmaking 

12 in studio electives 

12 in trial majors 

36 in the liberal arts: 12 visual studies, 18 
humanities, 6 social studies and natural sciences 

36 in major studio, of which as many as 12 may 
be in studio seminars. 

B. Sophomore Review, accepted as satisfactory 
by the faculty. 

Junior Review, accepted as satisfactory by the 
faculty. 

Senior Review, accepted as satisfactory by the 
faculty. 

Senior Exhibition: work accepted as satisfactory 
by the major instructor. 

1. A review will not be accepted unless the 
required letter of intent is approved by a 
designated member of the faculty. 

2. Credit will not be awarded for work done in 
the major studio during the semester of the 
review, unless the student presents a satisfactory 
review, as evaluated by the faculty. 

C. A grade of C or better (C- will not suffice) for 
juniors and seniors for courses in the major field. 

D. A minimum of 30 credits taken at Swain, 18 
of which must be in 300-400 level advanced 
studio courses. 

E. A minimum of 9 credits of 400 level studio 
work in the student's chosen major field. 

F. For the painting major, a student must take 6 
credits of life drawing and 3 credits of figure 
modeling. 

For the sculpture major, a student must take 3 
credits in Sculpture 200, Materials and 
Techniques. 

For the graphic design major, a student must 
take 3 credits in photography and 3 credits in 
Design 200, Production and Process. 

G. Exceptions to the distribution requirements 
in liberal arts may be made by the Chairman of 
the Liberal Arts Department. 

H. For incoming students, the Admissions 
Committee may make exceptions to the studio 
distribution requirements. 

I. For students who are already enrolled, 
exceptions in the studio distribution requirements 
may be made by action of the faculty. 



J. A senior who has received an academic 
warning must complete a satisfactory review in 
order to graduate. 

K. Seniors must submit six slides of their work 
to the library. 




2. Registration for Classes Returning students 
are required to indicate during the spring 
semester whether they intend to return to 
school in the fall. Formal registration for classes, 
including payment of fees, occurs on an 
announced day immediately before the begin- 
ning of each semester. A student is not counted 
as registered for classes until all financial 
arrangements for the term have been completed. 
There is a fifty dollar fee for late registration. 

A student may enroll for no more than 18 credits 
in any one semester. A student who has received 
an academic warning may not enroll for more 
than 15 credits during the following semester. 

3. Changing Courses In order to withdraw from 
a course, add a course, or change from one 
course to another, the student must use the 
Notice of Change of Course Form available from 
the Registrar's office. It is the student's 
responsibility to secure the instructor's signature 
and return the completed form to the 
Registrar's office before the deadline. The 
student will receive credit for new classes added 
only if the Notice of Change of Course Form has 
been recorded by the Registrar by the end of the 
second week of a semester. The student will be 
allowed to withdraw from a course without 
receiving a grade in it only if the Notice of 
Change of Course Form has been recorded by 
the Registrar by the end of the eleventh week of 
the semester. After the eleventh week, any with- 
drawal will automatically be recorded as an F. 

4. Withdrawal from the College A student who 
finds it necessary to withdraw from the college 
during the semester must follow this procedure: 
A freshman or sophomore who intends to 
withdraw must meet with the Dean, and must 
submit a letter to the Dean indicating the reason 
for withdrawal. A junior or senior who intends 
to withdraw must first meet with the chairman 
of the major department, then must submit a 
letter to the Dean indicating the reason for with- 
drawal. In all cases, the date on which the Dean 



Academic Policies and Procedures 37 



receives the letter of withdrawal shall be 
considered as the official date of withdrawal. 
Tuition refunds are calculated on the basis of the 
official date of withdrawal. 

5. Attendance Students are permitted to be 
absent from class only in extreme circumstances: 
illness and emergencies. It is the student's 
responsibility to notify the school of the absence 
and its cause. 

6. Grading 

A. Credit Hours. Each credit hour represents 
approximately three hours of productive work a 
week, over the period of one semester. Typically, 
in studio classes, two of those hours will be 
spent in class and one will be in work outside of 
class. In a liberal arts course, one hour is spent 
in class and two hours are spent in work outside 
of class for each credit. For example, a three- 
credit drawing class will meet six hours a week 
and will require about three additional hours 
outside of class time. 

B. Grades. A grade report is given for each 
course at the end of each semester. Mid-semester 
grades are also given to all freshmen during the 
first term, and when an instructor wishes to 
advise a student of inadequate performance in a 
course. 

We use the grade scale A, B, C, D, F to indicate a 
student's achievement in a course. The grade A 
designates true excellence; B, an original and 
substantial contribution; C, that the student did 
what was expected; D, that the student did 
somewhat less. F indicates an inadequate 
performance and does not carry credit. 

No credit shall be given to juniors or seniors for 
a grade of less than "C" in the major field of study. 

"C" shall be an acceptable grade in a major 
studio course. A student receiving a grade of less 
than "C" in a major studio course will receive 
notice of academic warning. 

C. Grade Averages. To calculate the grade 
average we assign a number for each of the letter 
grades. A is 4.0, B is 3.0, C is 2.0, D is 1.0, F is 0. 
Each number equivalent of the grade the student 
earns is multiplied by the number of credits in 
the respective course. The resulting numbers are 
totaled and divided by the total credits for the 
term to give the student's grade average for the 
term. The grade average is a summary, giving an 
indication in a single number, of how well a 
student is doing. 

D. Grade Change. Once a grade has been 
reported to the Registrar, it may only be altered 
by the instructor upon approval of the Faculty 
Affairs Committee. 

E. Grade Appeal. If a student feels that an 
extreme injustice has been done in the assigning 
of a grade, the student may present the matter 



to the Dean. If the Dean agrees that there is 
cause for review, he may call a committee of 
three members of the faculty to review the 
student's work, and the grade assigned to it. If 
the committee finds the instructor incapable of 
giving grades with the normal degree of 
professional discernment, the instructor's 
responsibility may be reassigned by the Dean 
according to the usual processes of the school. 

F. Incompletes. If, because of extraordinary 
circumstances, a student is unable to complete 
the work required for a course by the time the 
course ends, the student may be given the grade 
of I (Incomplete) by prior formal arrangement 
with the instructor. The grade is a temporary 
grade, and will automatically become an F if the 
required work has not been completed within 
three weeks of the beginning of the following 
term. In order to carry a grade of Incomplete 
beyond this three-week limitation, the student 
must secure the written consent of the instructor 
and approval of the Dean. 




7. Academic Warning 

A. Freshmen and sophomores with semester 
grade averages of less than 1.7, and juniors and 
seniors who have earned less than a C in a major 
studio course will receive an academic warning. 
Students given an academic warning may not 
enroll for more than 15 credits during any single 
semester until they have been removed from 
academic warning 

B. A student on academic warning is required to 
submit work for a special review by a committee 
of the faculty. This review will take place during 
the semester in which the student is given an 
academic warning. During this review, the 
committee of the faculty will evaluate the 
student's improvement and determine whether 
the student should be removed from academic 
warning, remain on academic warning, or be 
recommended for suspension. It is the student's 
obligation, at this review to present evidence of 
significant improvement in the area where 
previous trouble has led to the academic 
warning. If there seems to be some discrepancy 
between the student's performance and the 
standards of the school, the student will be told 
after this review, and advised to leave the school 
and to reexamine his/her educational goals and 



38 Policies and Procedures 



objectives. The faculty may act to remove the 
academic warning following a satisfactory 
review. 

C. Except in extraordinary circumstances, a 
student receiving an academic warning for two 
successive semesters will not be permitted to 
continue enrollment. 

D. The faculty may act to place a student on 
academic warning for reasons other than failure 
to achieve a minimum grade point average. If 
the faculty does so act, that fact, and the reasons 
for it, will be conveyed to the student in writing. 

E. The faculty will use its discretion in giving 
any student an academic warning at the time of 
the sophomore, junior, or senior review. 

F. A senior who has received an academic 
warning must complete a satisfactory review in 
order to graduate. 

G. The faculty may use its discretion in putting 
any student on academic warning at the time of 
the sophomore, junior or senior review. 

H. A student cannot graduate while on academic 
warning. 




8. Policy for the Assigning of Transfer Credit 

Students accepted in transfer from other 
institutions shall be granted transfer credit 
toward the degree requirements of the school by 
action of the Dean and the Registrar, subject to 
the following policies: 

A. Credit will be granted for college-level courses 
that may be reasonably applied toward the 
degree requirements of the school. Courses in 
the arts and sciences will be transferable in so 
far as they meet the distribution requirements in 
visual studies, humanities, and social studies and 
natural sciences. 

B. Transfer credit will not be granted for courses 
completed with less than a grade of C. Courses 
graded C- are not acceptable. 

C. Admission of a transfer student into a major 
department, and placement within it, will be 
determined by the chairman of that department, 
or by a designated department member. 

D. Questions of doubt concerning acceptance of 
transfer credit will be referred for the 
determination of the Admissions Committee, or 
to the appropriate members thereof. 

E. At the time of admission, or at any time after 
the admission of a transfer student, the 
Admissions Committee may act to apply up to 
15 credits of transferable courses toward either 
the studio or the liberal arts requirements for 
the B.F.A. degree, on the basis of the student's 
demonstrated competence in the liberal arts. 
Transfer students must meet requirements for 
the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree, as described in 
Section 1, above. 

9. Change of Major Students changing their 
major fields will be subject to the same rules 
that apply to students transferring into the 
college from other institutions. 

10. Other Policies 

A. Transcripts. Students in good standing and 
alumni who have met all financial obligations to 
the school, are entitled to request transcripts of 
the record of the grades and financial aid they 
have received and the credits they have 
accumulated at Swain. Each transcript costs 
$2.00 and is released only at the written request 
of the student. 

B. Student Property. The school reserves the 
right to reproduce student work and to retain 
two works from each student for eventual 
exhibition. The student has the obligation to 
remove all other property from the school 
premises at the end of each academic year. At no 
time does the school take responsibility for safe- 
guarding student property. 



Academic Calendar 39 



C. Payment of Fees. Students and alumni who 
owe money to the school may not register for 
classes, receive official grade reports, or receive 
transcripts of their records. Such students may 
be given verbal reports of their grades, however. 
The only exceptions to this policy are as follows: 

1. Students for whom funds are coming to the 
school, sufficient to discharge their debts, as 
confirmed to the Comptroller. 

2. New students or returning students who have 
financial aid applications in progress, may be 
registered, pending receipt of aid funds, by 
action of the President, upon the recom- 
mendation of the Financial Aid Officer. 

D. Graduation. Students who have not satisfied 
all requirements for the B.F.A. degree, may 
participate in the graduation ceremony with 
their class, but not receive the diploma, as long 
as they lack fewer than 12 credits of degree 
requirements. 



E. Rights and Privacy Act. Section 438 of the 
General Education Provisions Act, as amended, 
also referred to as the Family Education Rights 
and Privacy Act of 1974, was enacted by the 
Federal Government in 1974 with a view to 
protecting the privacy of students in certain 
educational institutions. This statute, among 
other things, governs access to official records 
directly related to students which are maintained 
by educational institutions, limits the release of 
certain records to third parties, and contains 
provisions permitting students to challenge the 
contents of certain records. It is the policy of the 
Swain School of Design to comply with this 
statute, as amended, and the related rules and 
regulations in implementation thereof issued by 
the United States Department of Education. 



Sig Haines, Assistant 
Professor of Painting 




40 Course Descriptions 



Course Descriptions 




In Sculpture 131 an 
emphasis is placed on size 
and space as they relate to 
the human form. 



Foundation: Freshman Year 

Design 111,112 

An Introduction to Two-Dimensional Design 

introduces those principles which underlie the 
organization of all two-dimensional surfaces, the 
manipulation of line, shape, space, color, value, 
texture. The course is presented as a sequence of 
problems. Instruction emphasizes the process 
through which a visual idea is developed from 
first sketch to completion. (2 semesters — 
3 credits each) 

Drawing 121, 122 

Freshman Drawing presents some of the basic 
problems, techniques and references of the 
artist. The student observes naturally occurring 
structures and translates them onto a page 
through line, form, and the contrast between 
light and shade. The second semester 
emphasizes the study of the figure, including 
some study of human anatomy. (2 semesters — 
3 credits each) 

Sculpture 151, 152 

An Introduction to Three-Dimensional Design 

This course is basically concerned with the 
organization of space, and the expansion of the 
vocabulary of form. Emphasis is placed on 
developing technical skills to facilitate the 
translation of abstract ideas into tangible reality. 
(2 semesters — 3 credits each) 

Humanities 100, 105 

Freshman English Writing is a craft of finding 
and expressing one's convictions. Like drawing, 
writing is a means for making oneself more 
attentive to the working of the world. Like 
drawing, writing is a translation from the three- 
dimensional reality to the two-dimensional page. 
This course develops that craft. In addition, 
Freshman English presents for discussion 
significant writing by a variety of authors. 
(2 semesters — 3 credits each) 



Humanities 110 

Readings in Western Civilization The past 
informs the present. Aspects of the lives we live 
are organized in patterns as old as civilization. 
Through the study of major texts, this course 
presents some of the important themes that 
have occupied thinkers during the history of 
Western civilization. (Fall semester — 3 credits) 

Visual Studies 100 

An Introduction to Art History Before 1400 any- 
one working in the visual arts had two sources 
of information and inspiration. One is the visible 
world. The other is past art. This course 
explores the process of looking at the art others 
have made. Students are asked to notice what 
goes on in the act of interpretation, and to 
become attentive to visual evidence; to see 
beyond their own immediate reactions. The 
object of this course is to introduce the craft of 
seeing what another has seen, using the work of 
art as a record of that vision. (Spring semester 
— 3 credits) 

Foundation: Sophomore Year 

Printmaking 241, 242 

An Introduction to Printmaking All the major 
printmaking media are introduced in this course. 
Seven weeks are spent in intensive work with 
each of the following: relief printing, silkscreen, 
lithography, and intaglio printing (etching, 
drypoint, aquatint). The course also presents 
some of the history of printmaking, and the 
work of major figures who helped shape that 
history. (2 semesters — 3 credits each) 

Design 211, 212 

Trial Major in Graphic Design is a foundation 
course in graphic design. The course introduces 
fundamental aspects of typography: type as 
imagery, type as verbal message, the history and 
development of type forms and type in combi- 
nation with other graphic elements. A wide 
range of possibilities for those graphic elements 
is suggested: collage, illustration, abstract or 
geometric forms, etc. Students try a variety of 
approaches to design and evaluate their work in 
terms of solving visual communication 
problems. (2 semesters — 3 credits each) 

Painting 231, 232 

Trial Major in Painting This introduction to 
painting builds on the foundation of freshman 
design and drawing courses, and introduces basic 
oil technique. In the course of the year, students 
work through a series of studio problems: the 
still life, the figure, the landscape — and study 
traditional methods of representation and 
composition. Painting from nature is stressed as 
a teaching device, since it presents both students 
and instructor an objective standard against 
which to measure success in dealing with space, 
light, form and color. (2 semesters — 3 credits 
each) 



Course Descriptions 41 



Sculpture 251, 252 

Trial Major in Sculpture is aimed toward students 
considering a major in sculpture. The course 
further examines basic materials, and attempts 
to make the student more aware of the forms in 
the natural and man-made environment. Draw- 
ing is used as a vital means of recording and 
testing these ideas. Class critiques provide for an 
exchange of information and for developing a 
better critical judgement. (2 semesters — 
3 credits each) 

Major Studios 

Design 321, 322 

Major Studio in Graphic Design is a continuation 
of the trial major, but here the problems 
considered are more complex. Students work in 
their studios on assignments and meet weekly 
for group critiques. Projects might include such 
things as designing a series of book jackets, an 
identity program for a small business or the 
layout of a magazine article. During the junior 
year, a student is expected to develop an 
individual approach to solving design problems. 
(2 semesters — 9 credits each) 

Design 421, 422 

Major Studio in Graphic Design The fourth year 
is treated as the first year of the student's design 
career. A portion of the work is assigned by the 
instructor specifically to develop the student's 
professional portfolio. The remaining time is 
reserved for each senior, in concert with the 
instructor, to assemble an independent design 
program. The senior is expected to perform like 
a professional designer. The instructor plays the 
roles of consultant and client. (2 semesters — 
9 credits each) 

Painting 331, 332 

Major Studio in Painting Painting 331 builds on 
the abstract theories introduced in freshman 
design and the formal and observational skills 
emphasized in sophomore painting. The 
emphasis is on the careful observation and 
evaluation of form, color, and composition. The 
students work more independently, defining the 
direction their painting will take. All juniors 
majoring in painting are required to paint in the 
life studio during the first term, and to attend 
technical demonstrations and group critiques. 
(2 semesters — 9 credits each) 

Painting 431, 432 

Major Studio in Painting Students are expected 
to take increasing responsibility for their own 
direction and acquire skills at clarifying their 
goals. An important part of the major studio 
consists in seminars on traditional and 
contemporary art theory. 

Throughout the senior year the teacher 
functions as a critic. 



The graduating senior is expected to assemble a 
coherent and defensible body of work 
demonstrating significant commitment to a 
number of clearly specified problems and 
concerns. (2 semesters — 9 credits each) 

Printmaking 341, 342 

Major Studio in Printmaking The student who 
chooses the printmaking major works in all the 
principle printmaking media. Printmaking is 
viewed not just as a technical exercise, but as an 
aesthetic challenge that involves questions of 
form, design, historical precedence. During the 
course of the year students are expected to 
demonstrate the appropriateness of the 
printmaking media for the working out of their 
visual ideas. (2 semesters — 9 credits each) 

Printmaking 441, 442 

Major Studio in Printmaking By the senior year, 
students are expected to already have the formal 
mastery which will allow them to concentrate on 
imagery and formal questions. Special attention 
is given to exploring the graphic quality and the 
character peculiar to different printmaking 
methods. 

The graduating senior is expected to assemble a 
coherent and defensible body of work 
demonstrating a significant commitment to a 
number of clearly specified problems and 
concerns. (2 semesters — 9 credit hours) 

Sculpture 351, 352 

Major Studio in Sculpture builds on the basic 
information in problem-solving and use of 
materials gained during the two previous years. 
Students are encouraged to master the tools and 
techniques they are already familiar with, as well 
as more specialized ones introduced during the 
third year. Frequent discussions with instructors 
and regular group criticism with other students 
are scheduled. (2 semesters — 9 credits each) 

Sculpture 451, 452 

Major Studio in Sculpture The great amount of 
time allotted to senior workshops allows for 
more ambitious series or larger works. At this 
point, students should be forming a commit- 
ment and a sense of discipline, concentrating 
more deeply upon those sculptural problems and 
materials which they find most compelling. 

The graduating senior is expected to assemble a 
coherent and defensible body of work 
demonstrating a significant commitment to a 
number of clearly specified problems and 
concerns. The final formal presentation is 
evaluated on the basis of aesthetic quality and 
professionalism in concept and execution, and 
documented in slide form. (2 semesters — 
9 credits each) 





m 





Painters and printmakers 
as well as sculptors are 
encouraged to study the 
human form in three 
dimensions. 



42 Course Descriptions 




Studio Electivas 

Design 200 

Production and Processes is an intensive tech- 
nical course that explains the basic materials, 
tools, and processes that a graphic designer 
encounters. Practical exercises take a job from 
sketches to final printing. Areas covered include: 
methods of specifying type for typesetting, the 
use of photostats and halftones, mechanicals, 
photosilkscreen, and commercial printing. 
(3 credits) 

Drawing 221 

Life Drawing I is an intensive study of the human 
figure, intended to enable the student to 
translate exact observations to a page, and to 
understand the formal principles that organize a 
page. In the course of the semester, a number of 
attitudes toward the human figure are 
introduced. Some stress the idea that the body is 
a perfectly organized structure; others stress the 
expressive possibilities. (3 credits) Offered in 
the spring semester. 

Photography 213 

Basic Photography This course develops the 
use of the 35mm camera, basic techniques of 
film exposure and processing, and black and 
white printing. (3 credits) 

Sculpture 200 

Materials and Techniques in Contemporary 
Sculpture teaches the proper use of equipment 
necessary to manipulate steel, aluminum, bronze 
and wood, and provides familiarity with the 
properties of these materials in the light of 
contemporary aesthetics. (3 credits) Note: 
Sculpture 200 may be repeated for credit. 

Sculpture 222 

Figure Modeling The basic purpose of the 
course is to allow the student to begin analysis 
of the proportions of the human body, to experi- 
ence a form in space — a three-dimensional 
reality as opposed to the two-dimensional 
illusion of drawing. The course deals with reliefs 
in addition to the free-standing figure, to 
provide a bridge between drawing and sculpture. 
(3 credits) Offered in the fall semester. 
Note: Figure Modeling may be repeated for 
credit. 

Drawing 321 

Life Drawing II Life Drawing I is a prerequisite 
for this course, which the instructor may waive 
at his discretion. Students are encouraged to 
apply the media with which they are chiefly 
concerned to this study of the human figure, and 
to join in the criticism of each other's work and 
methods. (3 credits) Offered in the spring 
semester. Note: Life Drawing II may be 
repeated for credit. 



Photography 313 

Advanced Photography Students do more 

advanced work with lights and studio equipment, 

and are introduced to the view camera and large 

format negatives. (3 credits) 

Note: Photography 313 may be repeated for 

credit. 

Studio Seminar 400 

Interdisciplinary Studies: Word and Image 

Students examine the various places that writing 
and visual art come together, in an attempt to 
clarify the nature of each. Illustration, criticism, 
the writing of artists and poets about visual art, 
the language we use to describe visual objects, 
conceptual art, and the possibility of inferring 
meaning from a formal structure are among the 
areas to be considered. 

There will be assigned visual work, writing and 
readings. 

Class limited to 8 students from all departments 
subject to approval of the instructors. (3 credits) 
Offered as announced. 

Studio Seminar 420 

Advanced Color Theory and Application begins 
with an examination of various color media 
including painting, printing, sculpture, 
architecture, stage design, textiles and film. It 
proceeds with the study of the elements, the 
science, the aesthetics, the traditional theories 
and the psychology of color. Color will be 
regarded according to its use as expression, as 
decoration, as structure and as information. 
(3 credits) 

Studio Seminar 440 

Graphic Design Forum is a series of lectures and 
seminars, coordinated by a member of the 
Design Department, in which a number of 
professional designers and other guests will 
present various aspects of the profession. 
(3 credits) Offered as announced. 

Studio Seminar 430 

Drawing for Illustration The purpose of the 
course is two-fold. It serves to advance the 
student's skills in rendering the figure, still-life, 
and architectural forms. At the same time the 
student considers and resolves problems of 
appropriate imagery and design, and learns 
methods of research into literary and advertising 
texts. (3 credits) 

Studio Seminar 460 

Advanced Studio for Non-Majors This studio 
course provides students with an opportunity to 
pursue their interests and develop skills at an 
advanced level in an area other than their stated 
major. They will work alongside students 
regularly enrolled as majors in another 
discipline. The students will be expected to 



Course Descriptions 43 



participate fully in the same crits and dialogues 
as the regular majors. Course work will be 
reviewed on a weekly basis by the instructor 
assigned to that major. (3 credits) 

Liberal Arts Elective 

Humanities 200 

Myth and Fable examines the nature and meaning 
of mythology. It considers aspects of mythic 
narrative from antiquity to the present, and it 
explores what myths can teach us about the 
world and ourselves. (3 credits) Offered once 
every two years. 

Humanities 200 

Children's Literature explores works written for 
and about the period from early childhood to 
adolescence, with special emphasis on the 
meaning and nature of fairy tales. (3 credits) 
Offered once every two years. 

Humanities 200 

The Structure of Theatrical Composition provides 

a thorough familiarity, by reading, with 
important works that have been made for the 
theater. In addition, students act, write, and 
direct enough to gain some first hand under- 
standing of the nature of presenting a theater 
work publicly. (3 credits) Offered once every two 
years. 



Humanities 240 

Intermediate Writing offers the opportunity to 
continue developing specific writing skills, 
including criticism and fiction. (3 credits) 
Offered once every two years. 

Social Studies 200 

Technology and Society examines a series of 
historical examples illustrating the interaction 
between technology and society. (3 credits) 
Offered once every two years. 

Social Studies 210 

Social Observation provides an introduction to 
the art of social inquiry. Through a series of 
readings students consider different methods 
and problems encountered in the attempt to 
interpret social reality. (3 credits) Offered once 
every two years. 

Social Studies 220 

On Science explores the historical development 
of certain key themes in the sciences from 
antiquity to the present and traces the evolution 
of our explanations for the variety of species, for 
the architecture of the universe, for the structure 
of matter, and for the nature of vitality. Equal 
attention will be paid to the process of scientific 
discovery and to its cultural consequences. 
(3 credits) Offered once every two years. 




An advantage of a small 
school is the opportunity 
for one to one 
communication. 



44 Course Descriptions 



The darkrooms are located 
in the basement of the 
Rodman, and are open to 
students in all departments. 




Visual Studies 213 

A Survey of the History of Art since 1400 examines 

the history of art in the Western world from the 

Renaissance to the nineteenth century. 

(3 credits) Offered every year. 

Humanities 300 

Poetry Workshop has students write poems, and 
criticize, discuss and revise them in order to 
understand poetry as a means for clarifying 
thought. To further explore the nature of poetry, 
there are readings from major nineteenth and 
twentieth century poets. (3 credits) Offered once 
every two years. 

Humanities HO 

The Invention of America presents American 
literature in its historical context, examining the 
way in which that literature reflects principal 
themes in American social and intellectual 
history. (3 credits) Offered once every two years. 

Humanities 313 

Topics in Literature examines a particular theme, 
period or genre. Readings change. (3 credits) 
Offered as announced. 

Humanities 320 

The Work of One Writer or School of Writers 

involves the study of the works of a significant 
literary figure or movement and of the world 
reflected in those works. Readings change. 
(3 credits) Offered as announced. 

Social Studies 300 

The Utopian Vision examines an historical 
sequence of attempts to define the perfect 
human community and the values and perils of 
the Utopian imagination. (3 credits) Offered 
once every two years. 

Social Studies 310 

The Literature of Exploration studies first-hand 
narrative accounts by witnesses or participants 
in exploration and discoveries of historic or 
philosophic importance. (3 credits) Offered once 
every two years. 

Social Studies 313 

Topics in Social Studies examine a particular 

theme, theory, or approach to the study of social 

life. Readings change. (3 credits) Offered as 

announced. 




Social Studies 320 

The Work of One Social Thinker or School of 

Thought studies the work of a significant social 

thinker or movement and the effect of this work 

on contemporary and subsequent social thought. 

Readings change. (3 credits) Offered as 

announced. 

Visual Studies 310 

The Beginnings of Modern Art traces the 
development of modernism, starting with late 
Impressionism and ending with the dispersal 
and migration of artists from Europe in the late 
1930's. (3 credits) Offered once every two years. 

Visual Studies 320 

Renaissance Art studies painting, sculpture, and 
architecture from Giotto to Michelangelo. The 
class examines developing techniques and 
varying approaches to subject matter as it tracks 
those particular but shifting social values which 
define the Renaissance. (3 credits) Offered once 
every two years. 

Visual studies 330 

The History of Architecture explores aesthetic, 
social, and cultural issues surrounding outstand- 
ing monuments of architecture from antiquity to 
the present. (3 credits) Offered once every two 
years. 

Visual Studies 333 

Modern Sculpture traces the roots and develop- 
ment of modern sculpture, examining its 
frequently changing formal and expressive 
manifestations, from Rodin to the present. 
(3 credits) Offered once every two years. 

Visual Studies 340 

Art in the 19th Century explores the variety of 
definitions given to realism in the 19th century, 
and traces the emergence of those particular 
formal concerns which, at their extreme, 
contribute to the logic of modernism. The course 
begins with a consideration of David and Neo- 
Classicism and concludes with an analysis of the 
late works of Cezanne and Monet. (3 credits) 
Offered as announced. 

Visual Studies 343 

Design History traces the evolution of the practice 
of graphic design. Major developments in 
printing fom Gutenberg's time are discussed as 
an introduction, but the focus of attention is on 
developments in printing, typography and 
related fields in the 19th and 20th centuries. 
Several themes accompany the presentation of 
work in addition to questions of style and formal 
qualities: changes in methods of training graphic 
designers, the social role of graphic designers 
and the impact of changing technologies. 
(3 credits) Offered as announced. 



Course Descriptions 45 



Visual Studies 50 

Art Since 1945 focuses on major artistic move- 
ments in America since 1945 — our modern 
tradition. It explores what these American 
movements are by seeing what triggered them, 
how they developed and how they affected both 
contemporary and later developments. This 
interweave of modern tradition is followed 
through the art of the 60's. (3 credits) Offered 
once every two years. 

Humanities 400 

Creative Writing the Craft of Fiction examines the 
techniques of writing fiction. Students submit 
their writing and criticize each other's work. 
(3 credits) Offered once every two Years. 

Humanities 410 

History Workshop explores the methods, 
purposes, and results of thinking about the past. 
Readings change. (3 credits) Offered once every 
two years. 

Humanities 420 

Ethical Theory examines crucial ethical themes in 
the history of Western culture. (3 credits) 
Offered once every two years. 

Social Studies 400 

Social Theory examines theories of society, 
exploring and evaluating a sequence of written 
attempts to define the nature of economy, 
politics, and law. (3 credits) Offered once every 
two years. 

Social Studies 410 

Cosmos and Society follows a sequence of 
attempts at discovering, defining, and control- 
ling a relationship between theories of world 
order and society from Heraclitus to modern 
social planners. (3 credits) Offered once every 
two years. 

Humanities 450 

Guided Reading A student may work with an 

instructor on an individually designed program 

of reading. The department must approve the 

program in advance. Enrollment in Guided 

Reading is limited. (3 credits) Offered every 

semester. 

Humanities 460 

Guided Writing A student may work with an 

instructor on an individually designed program 

of writing. The department must approve the 

program in advance. Enrollment in Guided 

Writing is limited. (3 credits) Offered every 

semester. 



Social Studies 450 

Guided Reading A student may work with an 

instructor on an individually designed program 

of reading. The department must approve the 

program in advance. Enrollment in Guided 

Reading is limited. (3 credits) Offered every 

semester. 

Social Studies 460 

Guided Writing A student may work with an 

instructor on an individually designed program 

of writing. The department must approve the 

program in advance. Enrollment in Guided 

Writing is limited. (3 credits) Offered every 

semester. 

Visual Studies 400 

Aesthetics and Criticism examines through major 
works a variety of philosophies of art and 
explores the ways in which each can be used as a 
basis for criticism. (3 credits) Offered once every 
two years. 

Visual Studies 415 

The Work of One Artist or School of Artists 

concentrates on the work of a single artist or 
movement. Subjects change. (3 credits) Offered 
as announced. 

Visual Studies 420 

Workshop in Exhibition requires students to 
consider collectively the relationship between art 
and audience. The class formulates, researches, 
catalogs, and mounts a public gallery exhibition 
of works drawn from outside the school 
community. (3 credits) Offered once every two 
years. 

Visual Studies 450 

Guided Reading A student may work with an 

instructor on an individually designed program 

of reading. The department must approve the 

program in advance. Enrollment in Guided 

Reading is limited. (3 credits) Offered every 

semester. 

Visual Studies 460 

Guided Writing A student may work with an 

instructor on an individually designed program 

of writing. The department must approve the 

program in advance. Enrollment in Guided 

Writing is limited. (3 credits) Offered every 

semester. 



Also located in the 
Rodman Building are light 
tables, dry mounting and 
photostat equipment. 




46 Trustees, Administration, and Faculty 



Bruce H. Yenawine {center) 
at a recent opening. 




Trustees, Administration & Faculty 



Board of Trustees 

sumner J. waring, JR., Chairman 
MARK L. SCHMID, Vice-Chairman 
ernest c. frias, Treasurer 
TIMOTHY J. COTTER, Assistant Treasurer 
HELEN K. GODDARD, Clerk 

JOHN M. xifaras, Assistant Clerk 

RICHARD D. BATCHELDER 
DANIEL COONEY 
DICK DOUGHERTY 
DAPHNE HUBBARD 
WALTER J. HUGHES 
STEPHEN REMICK 
ANTONE G. SOUZA, JR. 
ANDREW K. SPONGBERG 
ROBINSON C. TROWBRIDGE 
MILLICENT TUCKERMAN 
MARION WILNER 



Administration 

BRUCE H. YENAWINE, President 

SAM J. krizan, Dean of the College 

SARAH benham, Gallery Director 

ANN borges, Bookkeeping Assistant 

ELIZABETH c. BRYANT, Comptroller 

DIANE B. CAMBRA, Registrar 

diane conlon, Receptionist 

FRED GOMES, Superintendent of Buildings and 

Grounds 

lili HSING, Administrative Assistant to the 

President 

GRACE JONES, Bookstore Clerk 

carol leeson, Development Director 

MARTHA maier, Library Director 

DENNIS MATTOS, Maintenance Assistant 

nickie pelczar, Financial Aid Officer 

Virginia SEXTON, Assistant to the Admissions 

Director 

CLAIRE TABER, Assistant to Library Director 

A.D. TINKHAM, Admissions Director 

CHERYL ZIEGERT, Student Services Director 



Trustees, Administration, and Faculty 47 



Faculty 

RICHARD P. ANCONA 

Assistant Professor 

B.F.A. Southeastern Massachusetts University 

M.F.A. Cranbrook Academy 

M.A.E. Rhode Island School of Design 

JACQUELINE BLOCK 

Assistant Professor of Painting 
B.F.A. Cooper Union 

JAMES BOBRICK 

Associate Professor of Liberal Arts 
Chairman of the Liberal Arts Department 
A.B. Boston University 
Ph.D Boston University 

JIM CATALANO 

Assistant Professor of Printmaking 
B.F.A. State University of N.Y. at Buffalo 
M.F.A. State University of N.Y. at Buffalo 

DICK DOUGHERTY 

Associate Professor of Painting 
B.F.A. Maryland Institute 
M.F.A. Maryland Institute 

SEVERIN HAINES 

Assistant Professor of Painting 
Chairman of the Painting Department 
B.F.A. Swain School of Design 
M.F.A. Yale University 

KAREN HURST 

Instructor, English Laboratory 

B.A. University of California, Berkeley 

M.A. Southeastern Massachusetts University 

ERIC LINTALA 

Instructor of Sculpture 
B.F.A. Kent State University 
M.F.A. Kent State University 

VIKRAM MALIK 

Instructor of Liberal Arts 
B.A. Michigan State University 
M.F.A. Case-Western Reserve University 
M.A. University of Saskatchewan 
M.F.A. University of Tennessee 

BENJAMIN MARTINEZ 

Assistant Professor of Painting 
B.F.A. Cooper Union 

JOHN OSBORNE 

Associate Professor of Design 

N.D.D. Medawy College of Art 

M.F.A. California College of Arts and Crafts 

SUSAN PERL 

Instructor of Design 

B.F.A. Montclair State College 

M.A.T. Rhode Island School of Design 

DAVID ROSENBERG 

Assistant Professor of Liberal Arts 

B.A. Ithaca College 

M.A. University of Massachusetts, Amherst 



DAVID LOEFFLER SMITH 

Professor of Painting 

Hans Hofmann School 

B.A. Bard College 

M.F.A. Cranbrook Academy of Art 

ESTHER SOLONDZ 

Instructor of Photography 

B.A. Clark University 

M.F.A. Rhode Island School of Design 

MARC ST. PIERRE 

Assistant Professor of Printmaking 
Chairman of the Printmaking Department 
B.F.A. Laval Universite 
M.F.A. Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville 

ROBIN TAFFLER 

Assistant Professor of Sculpture 
Chairman of the Sculpture Department 
B.F.A. Kansas City Art Institute 
M.F.A. Cranbrook Academy of Art 

JUDITH TOLNICK 

Assistant Professor of Liberal Arts 
B.A. Brandeis University 
M.A. Brown University 




^1 Fred Gomes 



48 Maps 



How to Get Here 



1 Crapo Building 
Painting Department 
Gallery 
Bookstore 

2 Currier Building 

3 Painting Studios , 

4 Melville Building Library 

5 President's House 

6 Rodman Building 
Business, Financial Aid Office 
Registrar, Admissions, Dean's Office 
Student Services 

Development Office 
President's Office 
Cafeteria 

7 Rodman Annex 
Design Department 

8 Elm Street Garage 
Printmaking Department 
Sculpture Department 

9 Genensky Building 
Maintenance 





1 North to: 
1 Interstate 195 
1 Boston 
1 Providence 
Rt. 6 West (Mill Street) | Cape Cod 


Rt. 6 East (Kempton Street) j 




Elm Street 


East to: 

Historic District 
Whaling Museum 










Downtown 
Fishing Piers 




Morgan Street 




Court Street 




Union Street 


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Maple Street 


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Madison Street H 


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Buttonwood 
Park & Zoo 


Hawthorn Street 


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Swain School of Design Campus 



Maps 49 




To: 

Hartford 

New York City 



Southeastern New England 




North to: 
Boston 




c \ Buttonwood 
S \ Park 

CO 

> 

< 



X 



Interstate 195 



East to: 
Cape Cod 



3 
O 



Route 6 



Union Street 



Hawthorn Street 



New Bedford 
Harbor 




New Bedford 








Swain School of Design 19 Hawthorn Street New Bedford, Massachusetts 02740 (617)997-7831